DNC campaigns receive warning about phishing hackers posing as Facebook

 
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden at a campaign event in New Castle, Delaware, U.S., July 21, 2020 (photo credit: KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS)
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden at a campaign event in New Castle, Delaware, U.S., July 21, 2020
(photo credit: KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS)

The email shares a link which directs to a website which appears to allow you to appeal the decision, according to the report - requesting login information as well as further personal information.

Those affiliated with the Democratic National Committee (DNC) received a notice on Thursday that phishing hackers posing as Facebook officials could be trying to obtain their Facebook account information, according to CNN.
The DNC's security team alerted their campaigns that these cyberattackers have designed convincing emails that appear to be coming from Facebook, which note that their accounts have been removed due to a terms of conditions violation.
"This means that you can still see the page, but other people won't be able to see it," the email reads, according to CNN.
The email shares a link which directs to a false website which appears to allow you to appeal the decision, according to the report, and requests login information as well as further personal information.
The news comes two weeks after Twitter said hackers accessed its internal systems to hijack some of the platform’s top voices including US presidential candidate Joe Biden, reality TV star Kim Kardashian, former US Ppresident Barack Obama and billionaire Elon Musk and used them to solicit digital currency.
Twitter said employees with access to its internal systems had been successfully targeted by hackers who “used this access to take control of many highly-visible (including verified) accounts and Tweet on their behalf.”
Twitter temporarily took the extraordinary step of preventing for several hours at least some verified accounts from publishing messages altogether. It said it would restore access only when it was certain it could do so securely.
Publicly available blockchain records show the apparent scammers received more than $100,000 worth of cryptocurrency.
Zachary Keyser and Reuters contributed to this report.